tire
RICHMOND SUBARU WINTER TIRE SPECIALS 

When the temperature drops below 7°C you are safer driving on winter tires 

All-season tires are a bad compromise. On snow, ice or cold pavement, the stopping distance of a car with winter tires can be up to 30 to 40 per cent shorter than one with all-seasons. Since the force of a crash increases as the square of impact speed, this could be the difference between life and death.

 

Although it’s the treads that you notice, the most important part of a winter tire is actually its rubber compound, which is designed to stay soft in freezing temperatures. Like a gecko climbing a sheet of glass, a tire sticks to the road by conforming to minute imperfections. The soft rubber treads of a winter tire are able to splay and wrap themselves around minute protrusions on cold pavement, or even on what may appear to be perfectly smooth ice. Summer tires, which are designed to operate in warm temperatures, harden as the temperature falls. All-seasons, which must be designed for year-round use, cannot match winter tires in low temperatures.

Premium winter tires perform better than basic models. What you’re paying for is the latest in rubber technology and tread design. What you get is traction that may be up to 15 per cent better than economy-model winter tires. (If you want to see the difference between different grades of winter tires, go to an ice race. ”The drivers with the premium tires are all out front,” says Ontario racer and winter driving instructor Ian Law. ”There’s no comparison.”)

 

It’s about temperature, not snow. Winter tires should be installed when you expect temperatures to fall to 7 C or below. As the temperature falls, the rubber in summer and all-season tires becomes inflexible, killing traction. Watch the thermometer and use common sense, because no one will tell you exactly when to put on snow tires (unless you live in Quebec, where the law dictates that your car be equipped with winter tires between Dec. 15 and March 15).

 

Winter tires are designed to move water. When a tire presses down on snow or ice, it melts the top layer, creating a thin film of water (the same phenomenon that occurs as a skate glides across a rink). If the water isn’t moved away from the area in front of the tire, the car will hydroplane. This is why winter tires are covered with grooves (including tiny channels known as ”sipes”) that move water away to the sides, allowing the tire to stay in contact with the surface.

 

All-wheel drive helps you accelerate, not stop. On slippery surfaces, vehicles with four driving wheels can accelerate better than those with two-wheel drive. But their cornering and braking capabilities are little different than a two-wheel-drive model. When you’re trying to stop or turn, the limits are determined by the traction capabilities of your tires, not the number of driven wheels.

 

Black ice is not a death sentence. Good winter tires can stick to glare ice, but only if they are within their traction limits. If your car begins to slide, look straight down the road to where you need to go, and maintain a light grip on the wheel. As the car decelerates, you will gradually regain control as the tire’s rubber begins gripping surface imperfections on the ice. Slow speed and gentle control inputs will maintain traction.

 

 In the old days, winter tires came with deep, aggressive treads designed to paddle through deep snow. This made for a noisy ride and compromised stability, since the treads deflected under acceleration, braking and cornering loads. Current winter tire technology focuses on shallower treads with closely spaced grooves that carry away the water film created when the tire presses down on ice or snow.

 

Although they offer an advantage on glare ice, studded tires are far less effective than non-studded models on cold, bare pavement (where most drivers spend the majority of their time during the winter months).

 

Some manufacturers offer winter tires that use rubber mixed with hard materials (like crushed walnut shells and chopped nylon strands) to give increased bite. Although these can offer improved traction in some conditions, the most important factors in a winter tire’s all-round grip are the quality of its rubber compound and its tread design.

 

 

Richmond Subaru now offers convenient, low cost tire storage. Store your seasonal tires in our insured and secured tire storage warehouse. Each tire is measured, recorded, tagged and shipped to our tire storage warehouse facility. When you wish to retrieve your tires from storage, simply notify our Service Department. Within 2 days, your tires will be ready for installation by our Factory Trained Technicians. Safe, simple and convenient.

 

 

 

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*We make every effort to present information that is accurate. However, it is based on data provided by the vehicle manufacturer and/or other sources and therefore exact configuration, color, specifications & accessories should be used as a guide only and are not guaranteed. Under no circumstances will we be liable for any inaccuracies, claims or losses of any nature. Furthermore, inventory is subject to prior sale and prices are subject to change without notice, cannot be combined with any other offer(s), do not include provincial or local taxes, tags, registration or title fees. To ensure your complete satisfaction, please verify accuracy prior to purchase.
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